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here on world report. again, we are continuing to keep a close eye on the situation of the jpl in pasadena. but, we will also have a story on the future of recycling in china and why it cost hundreds of thousands of jobs. i love to eat. i love hanging out with my friends. i have a great fit with my dentures. i love kiwis. i've always had that issue with the seeds getting under my denture. super poligrip free -- it creates a seal of the dentures in my mouth. even well-fitting dentures let in food particles. super poligrip is zinc free. with just a few dabs, it's clinically proven to seal out more food particles so you're more comfortable and confident while you eat. super poligrip free made the kiwi an enjoyable experience. [ charlie ] try zinc free super poligrip. wisconsin, friends and family came together in a park for t.o. remember the victims mafs shooting at a sikh temple. the attack happened at oak creek just outside milwaukee. ted rollins reports, authorities are treating the incident as domestic terror. >> reporter: investigators will spend the night combing not only th
pattern on those wheels. it is morse code for jpl, jet propulsion laboratory. every time it rolls across the surface it will be writing jet propulsion laboratory on mars. you may think of it as the first graw fooy tee -- graffiti on mars. >> thank you very much, wayne. >>> now to the deadly shooting at a sikh temple in wisconsin. the fbi is treating the attack as a domestic terrorism case. authorities say local sikhs were gathering for sunday service when a man walked into the temple and started shooting. the gunman took the lives of six people before being killed by a police officer. that officer was wounded along with three others. >> this is a big tragedy for our church, a church we felt this was a safe place. we never thought this could happen in my church. >> police are now investigating the suspect's home which is located near the temple. >> and right now richmond police are on the scene of a fatal shooting on west mcdonald avenue near first street. officers were called there a little after 9 oocht 30 p.m. police say one person was shot to death. a second person was injured, but hi
on planet earth who was watching. let's take a look at that moment in jpl when they got their confirmation. >> touchdown confirmed. we are safe on mars. >> [cheering] >> we are wheels down on mars. >> by the time they relayed the information curiosity had been on mars for seven minutes. look at the mix of triumph, relief and then unbridled joy as curiosity sent back the first images of the surface. thumbnails as they call them from each corner of the rover showing how sits and how it fares. it is the best possible outcome sharing this experience which is one reason why they came to watch at nasa aimes tonight. >> in a sometimes cynical, sometimes idealistic world it took an attempted landing on a different one, mars, to bring all of these people back to the aimes research center. >> this is eight and a half months of waiting at the end of a long mission. >> there are not too many mars landings in my lifetime, so i am glad to see one. >> it took the curiosity rover from space to the surface of mars. from an entry feet of 13 kilometers per second to 0 in ser harrowing minutes. a one-ton rove
last second decisions on its own. with no help from the engineers at j.p.l. >> as far as the amount of control that the team has during entry, descent and landing, it's identical to the control that anybody watching at home has. we're all along for the ride. >> reporter: scientists can only watch as the last seven minutes of this ambitious mission determines the outcome says cbs news space analyst bill harwell. >> if it is a success it will be one of the great scientific triumphs of the space-age and if it fails i think it could be a setback for interplanetary exploration. >> reporter: the mission is to search for evidence that mars once could support life, an exploration that is expected to last two years. >> glor: what kind of tools and equipment does the rover have? >> well, it begins with the mask there that has a number of cameras on it to capture detailed panoramic images of regard mars as you have never seen before. other than that it is equipped to do what a human geologist would do on mars. pick up samples of rock and soil and then run them through an onboard laboratory to
who was watching. let's take a look at that moment in jpl when they got their confirmation. >> touchdown confirmed. we are safe on mars. >> [cheering] >> we are wheels down on mars. >> by the time they relayed the information curiosity had been on mars for seven minutes. look at the mix of triumph, relief and then unbridled joy as curiosity sent back the first images of the surface. thumbnails as they call them from each corner of the rover showing how sits and how it fares. it is the best possible outcome sharing this experience which is one reason why they came to watch at nasa aimes tonight. >> in a sometimes cynical, sometimes idealistic world it took an attempted landing on a different one, mars, to bring all of these people back to the aimes research center. >> this is eight and a half months of waiting at the end of a long mission. >> there are not too many mars landings in my lifetime, so i am glad to see one. >> it took the curiosity rover from space to the surface of mars. from an entry feet of 13 kilometers per second to 0 in ser harrowing minutes. a one-ton rove
to talk to nasa tv live broadcasting from j.p.l. in pasadena, california. >> that converged at seven meters a second. >> right. >> and this is a separation of power light. down to 90 meters per second and sending. >> this is a power code with director of communications at this time. we're down to 86 meters per second and sending. we've lost tones from earth at this time. this is expected. we're continuing monitoring. >> and ground solution equals 18 seconds. >> standing by for back up separation. >> we're in power flight. descending about 0 meters per second. 500 meters in altitude. standing by for sky crane. >> we've found a place to come in ready for sky train 40 meters altitude. this is about 7.5 meters as expected. >> this is stable. stable. >> woo-hoo! woo! >> going to see where our curiosity will take us. >> now we know the landing was a success, lots of celebrating going on right now from jet propulsion laboratory in pasadena. tom, we see celebrating but what does this mean now that the landing was a success. >> this just opens the next chapter in mars exploration, congratulat
. >> thousands. mission control at jpl, you have probably other people. they built the spacecraft there. everything was assembled there. and now you've got teams of scientists that are running the different instrument packages. so it's big team for a $2.5 billion mission i >> put something in perspective. we'll do a live remote with somebody. they could be in downtown washington. we could talk with them and there will be a significant delay from when i ask the question and you get the answer from the person. you go from place to place, you can't get coverage, you can't hear something would might be three miles away. >> is this a rap session. >> no, no, no, here is my question. how are we able to control this device 352 million miles away. how is it it can send a picture back within moments of landing on mars? >> because it is all set in the computer program. what they did for this was mars odyssey which is a spacecraft that is in orbit was using the radio uplink between the spacecraft which is now the rover and they were sending data back because the thing that is amazing, when she was
. john blackstone is at jpl in pasadena, california. john, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, jeff. i think we can safely say this morning that the jet propulsion lab is the happiest place on earth. because the "curiosity" over, the car-sized rover, this is just a model, the real thing is safely on the surface of mars. it's such a complex landing that some observers gave the chances of success at no better than 50/50. nobody had ever done anything like this before. and it was all happening 154 million miles away. >> we're just under six minutes to entry. >> in mission control, the tension was obvious as the spacecraft approached mars to begin what was called seven minutes of terror. but with each successful stage of the entry, confidence grew. >> parachute deploy. [ applause ] >> nothing was certain, however, until "curiosity" was confirmed to have landed safely on martian soil. >> touchdown confirmed we are safe on mars. [ cheering ] >> as the celebration began, mission control seemed to lose control. many involved had been working on this mars rover for a decade. >> lift-off. >>
to do it at jpl. >> exciting stuff. >> i know you will write about this. >> one last thing, tony. >> tucker says it will clear up this weekend. we can see mars in the western sky. i will have a chart this weekend so people can go out and look and see mars, wave hello at curiosity and check out the meteor shower on saturday night, the per see equaled. >> that's right. >> thanks. good to have you. >> thanks, greg, tony. >>> time is 8:38. monday morning. still ahead, football preseason is underway. we will show you highlights from the hall of fame game. e. i'm drinking dunkin'. i'm drinking dunkin' iced mocha. they make it exactly how i like it. medium, iced, with a turbo shot. french vanilla, hazelnut, caramel -- i love 'em all. they make it perfect every time. america runs on dunkin' coffee. that's mom to you. and you should eat something that's good for you before you go outside. never! come on james. it's a new fiber one chewy bar. chocolatey and delicious. fiber one chewy bar, huh? mmm. refueled space captain james. [ male announcer ] new fiber one chewy bars. great taste kids
. >> i love this guy. >> the mohawk guy was a flight director at the mars science laboratory, the jpl there. he is helping the mars rover curiosity land. he apparently cuts a different hairdo for each landing. this one set the world on fire here. on twitter overnight i was seeing so many tweets about the mohawk guy. quite handsome, by the way. >> he is kind of handsome. he's got red in there. >> he's got red, yellow stars. good news, he went from 200 twitter followers to 10,000 after curiosity landed. >> his mohawk needs a twitter alias i think. >>> this morning's top stories straight ahead. we'll have new details and stories from inside a sikh temple. we're speaking the a relative of the temple leader who is being called a hero this morning. you're watching "early start." fore! no matter what small business you are in, managing expenses seems to... get in the way. not anymore. ink, the small business card from chase introduces jot an on-the-go expense app made exclusively for ink customers. custom categorize your expenses anywhere. save time and get back to what you love. the latest
jpl employees on staff. host: kelly from massachusetts on our independent line. caller: you said you are giving companies $1.1 billion. why are we giving them money to reinvent the wheel? we already have the technology to get into space. why aren't we sharing the technology? guest: the companies are using nasa's technology to get into space. the space shuttle was an incredibly capable vehicle, but was not a cheap vehicle. it had a lot capabilities that we did not need. it was a vehicle that was good for lower earth orbits. they build two capabilities to replace it. the other is to go beyond lower earth orbit, but we did do with the apollo program. the space shuttle was a very high-tech vehicle but it wasn't the right vehicle for where we're going now. host: here are some numbers from 2011, looking at contract awards that were given how. host: these funds were given to companies. a question from monty on twitter . guest: the commercial applications can seem far- fetched. if you can find water, water can be turned into fuel that you can use to power a rocket. it can be useful for explo
the olympics. it sounded like last night at the jpl, at the jet prop pulse lab who are the ones responsible for the mars rover working for nasa. their laboratory in pasadena california. here was the big word. >> wooo! wooo >> they are wound pretty tight. >> they have been working. imagine how many years they have been working on this thing. >> sure, yeah. >> how much money they spent. originally, they put one.$6,000,000,000 toward this project and it ended up costing two and a half billion dollars. >> my tax dollars well spent. >> uh-huh. >> just amazing. what was it? like 14 minutes or so because there wasn't any direct line with earth at the time that it landed. so it took 14 minutes for it to kind of turn the corner and make that what? 154 million miles. so it took that long. there was a period where they thought it was down but they didn't know for like 14 minutes, i guess. they had to wait and wait and wait and wait and then boom. >> that's when that news came. very exciting. >> it's awesome. i love -- i love the space program stuff. >> yeah. >> and the
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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